BRITANNIA
America's Gateway to the British Isles since 1996


 
 
  
 



HOMEPAGE

TRAVEL

HISTORY

FOR TRAVELLERS
Airport Transfers
BritRail Passes, Eurostar
Hotels Reservations
London Hostels
Car Rental
Vacations Packages
Travel Resources

TOURS
London Guided Tours
Virtual UK Tours

DESTINATION GUIDES
UK County/City
London Guide
Wales
Scotland

UK DIRECTORIES
Hotels & B&Bs
Self Catering Cottages
Student Travel
Tourist Boards
Castles & Historic Houses
English Country Houses
Golfing in the UK
Boating Vacations
Museums
National Parks
Festivals
Colleges & Universities
Pub Guides

BRITANNIA
About Britannia
Terms of Use
Privacy Statement
Awards & Accolades
Links
Advertising Rates
Contact us

Tours > Gloucester > Deerhurst The Tiny Chapel of Odda's Lost Palace

Deerhurst The Tiny Chapel of Odda's Lost Palace
Odda's Chapel, Deerhurst, Gloucestershire

Directions: It is difficult to tear yourself away from such a remarkable building as St. Mary's in Deerhurst, but just down the road is yet another. Follow the signs to Odda's Chapel.
Odda's Chapel is a tiny Saxon chapel now built into a medieval timber-framed farmhouse which obscures the eastern chancel. The building is a simple two-cell structure with characteristic Saxon long and short quoins. It is very plain inside, but retains its original chancel arch and a number of Saxon windows. Its importance was only recognised in 1885, despite the fact that an important stone inscription was found nearby some two hundred years before. A copy is on display:
"Earl Odda had this Royal Hall built and dedicated in honour of the Holy Trinity for the soul of his brother, Aelfric, which left the body in this place. Bishop Ealdred dedicated it the second of the Ides of April in the fourteenth year of the reign of Edward, King of the English."

[12th April 1056]

Odda is a well known figure of the period. He was Earl of Hwicce and a captain of the Royal Fleet, not to mention, a kinsman of King Edward the Confessor. The stone implies that he and his brother, Aelfric, built (or rebuilt) a large palace complex here which included the chapel. It would not have been unlike that excavated at Cheddar (Somerset). Both men are known to have died at Deerhurst and to have been buried in Pershore Abbey.



Next Stop: Magical History Tour




Copyright ©2007 Britannia.com, LLC   Questions? Comments!