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Tours > Sussex Churches > Burton

Dedication Unknown - Burton
SU 968176; Three Miles Southwest of Petworth

If stone could speak this tiny church would have many tales to tell. Built in the late eleventh century it has always served a small population, although the converted mansion house nearby has increased the number of people who live in the area considerably.

The church is a small two-cell building of just nave and chancel with a tiny stone tower built over the western end of the nave. The interior contains a host of memorable furnishings. There is a very good mural painting of the Royal Arms of King Charles I dated 1636 with the text 'Obey them that have the Rule over you'. Another wall painting on the splay of a north window represents St. Uncumber a popular medieval saint with wives who had got tired of their husbands! Her legend tells us that when she was forced to marry a man against her will she prayed about it and sprouted a massive beard which put her husband to be off the idea. Her father, disappointed that this marriage would not now take place, put her to death!

Dividing the nave from the chancel is a medieval Rood Screen that not only retains its original loft, but also substantial remains of its medieval paintwork. Rood Screens and Lofts were declared illegal as part of the Reformation and whilst many disappeared altogether, some survived with a few, such as this, retaining its loft. There are many monuments in the church including the Goring tomb of 1558 which displays a monumental brass together with brass tablets under a fine gothic canopy. The church was restored by Mr Henry Goring his descendant, in the 1950s.

Next Stop: Burpham



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