The Britannia Lexicon

MALETOTE :
harsh tax on wool sacks.

MAN :
in this sense, to be a lord's man, to owe obligations to, in the forms of labor or service. A woman can also be someone's man.

MAN-AT-ARMS :
soldier holding his land, generally 60-120 acres, specifically in exchange for military service. Sometimes called a Yeoman.

MANGONEL :
stone-throwing maachine worked by torsion.

MANOR :
small holding, typically 1200-1800 acres, with its own court and probably its own hall, but not necessarily having a manor house. The manor as a unit of land is generally held by a knight (knight's fee) or managed by a bailiff for some other holder.

MANTLET :
mobile wooden protective shield on wheels.

MARCHER LORDS :
the name commonly given to Norman landholders on the Welsh border.

MARK :
measure of solver, generally eight ounces, accepted throughout western Europe. In England is worth thirteen shillings and four pence, two-thirds of one pound.

MARKET :
place where goods may be bought or sold, established in a village or town with the authorization of a king or lord. This noble extends his protection to the market for a fee, and allows its merchants
various economic and judicial privileges.

MASON-STOPPED :
the right-angle return of a moulding cut in the solid, in contradistinction to scribing to fit a corner.

MEDALLION :
circular or oval shape bearing a figure or symbol.

MERLON :
solid upward projection of a battlement or crennelation

MICHAELMASS :
Feast of St. Michael on 29 Sept.

MINSTER :
loosely-used term for a major church: the cathedral at York is always known as York Minster.

MINSTREL :
poet and singer, also called a jongleur, who lives and travels off of the largess of the aristocracy.

MISERICORD :
projecting ledge on underneath of hinged seat of stall, to support the occupant standing.

MOAT :
deep trench dug around a castle to prevent access from the surrounding land. It could be either left dry or filled with water.

MONASTERY :
A place where monks or nuns live for a religious life.

MONEYER :
person licenced by the crown to strike coins, receiving the dies from the crown, and keeping 1/240 of the money coined for himself.

MORMAER :
Gaelic Title (Great Steward) given to the rulers of the seven provinces of Celtic Scotland.

MORTISE :
cavity cut into a piece of timber to receive the tenon of another piece cut to fit it.

MULLION :
slender shaft which forms the division between the lIghts of a window or screen.

MUNTIN :
the divisions framing a piece of panelling.

MURDER-HOLES :
openings in roof of gateway or part of gatehouse over entrance passage, popularly thought to be used for dropping missiles or shooting weapons at besiegers, but more probably for rapid water discharge over wooden parts, such as gates, set on fire by besiegers.

MURRAIN :
plague alflicting animals, especially cattle and sheep.




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