The Britannia Lexicon

DANEGELD :
tribute paid to the Danes (Dane Gold).

DAUB :
a mud of clay mixture applied over wattle to strengthen and seal it.

DECORATED :
the style of English architecture most common during the period (1250-1380).

DEMESNE :
the part of the lord's manorial lands reserved for his own use and not allocated to his serfs or freeholder tenants. Serfs work the demesne for a specified numbers of days per week. The demesne may either be scattered among the serfs land, or a separate area, the latter being more
common for meadow and orchard lands.

DEMI-ANGEL :
the upper half of an angel appearing out of clouds.

DENARIUS :
the English silver penny, hence the abbreviation "d" and the coin most common circulation.

DESTRIER :
knight's courser led by his squire with the right hand.

DIAGONAL BUTTRESS :
buttress constructed at the angle of a building.

DIAGONAL RIBS :
those crossing a bay of a vault at right angles from corner to corner.

DIAPERING :
decoration ofwall surface in patterned brick or stone.

DIOCESE :
district subject to the jurisdiction of a Bishop/Archbishop. The name is derived from the administrative districts created by the roman emperor Diocletian.

DOG-TOOTH :
small pyramidal carved ornament in late Norman and Early English architecture.

DOMICAL VAULT :
bay of vaulting shaped like a dome.

DONJON :
alternative word for great tower.

DORTER :
monastic dormitory.

DOUBLE MONASTERY :
combined monastery for men and women but sexually separated. Ruled by either an abbot or abbess.

DOUBLE OGRE :
moulding or line formed by a combination of a round and a hollow, partly concave and partly convex, when doubled forms a design.

DOUBLE TRACERY :
layer of tracery superimposed upon another.

DOWELLED :
fastened together by pins either of oak or copper.

DRAWBRIDGE :
wooden bridge which could be raised and lowered, sited in front of tower or D carved or smoothed stonework around openings and along.

DRENG :
the name given to a free peasant in Northumbria and sometimes in Yorkshire and Lancashire. The name usually implies that land is held in return for military service.

DRESSING :
carved or smoothed stonework around openings and along edges.

DROMOND :
very large ship used both in peace and war.

DUKE :
title from the Roman Dux, which has been held over from roman time by the ruler of a district called a duchy. In England the title is reserved for members of the royal family.

DUN :
Scottish single family hill fort.

DUNGEON :
the jail, usually found in one of the towers.




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