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News Report of Brinsop Court, north-west of Hereford in Herefordshire

B R I N S O P
C O U R T

A Grade 1 Medieval Moated Manor House and Estate

This superb red sandstone Manor House standing within a moat was built in the 14th century for the Tirrell family. It is set in attractive gardens and grounds and is in the centre of a 775 acre farming and sporting estate, which includes twelve cottages. This is a very picturesque house, which shows off its Medieval character to the bast advantage. Some of the windows have Gothic cusped ogee heads. It passed to the Dansey family and remained in their hands until 1820 when it was bought by David Ricardo of Gatcombe Park.

The north and south wings are original with the latter being the hall range and having an external stairway to the hall. The magnificent Great Hall itself is open to the roof timbers and has stone window seats and a large fireplace. The south wing also houses the Elizabethan Library which has wood panelling and a Jacobean overmantel, both coming from Mildmay House while the heavy plaster ceiling is an excellent reproduction. The west range is Georgian with a brick fascia and incorporates the 16th century timber framed Oak Parlour and the Queen Anne Dining Room with its beautiful plaster ceiling. The east wing was constructed in 1913 to enclose the courtyard as part of a restoration by Mr HD Astley. The four ranges enclose an inner courtyard. Some other timber framing can be seen in various places within and without the courtyard.

During David Ricardo’s ownership the property was leased for farming and a Mr Hutchinson, the brother-in-law of William Wordsworth the poet took up residence. William Wordsworth often visited his sister here between 1827 and 1845. The next tenant, Dearman Edwards eventually purchased the estate in 1909 but sold it on to Mr Astley in 1912 who set about a restoration. Since the last war Sir Derrick Bailey has owned the house.

The house is currently split into three separate self-contained units, which can easily be brought back together as one unit.




    
  

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